Batik Visuals Continued

Here’s my progress on the two batik visuals.

Its a little darker than I wanted..I accidently put it into the black dye bath rather than the darn green.

You can see it’s very crackled, I kept the wax solution to mostly parafin (candle) wax to achieve this.

I’ve started a new version, with a looser design and more beeswax at the beginning so the background will have less crackle.

The yellow, is actually a high concentration of beeswax(it will be white when ironed)

The pale pink is the first dye and the darkest colour is the second wax.

I wanted to show how outline is achieved. You can see I left a gap around the edges..Batik is like drawing in reverse, as the darkest colours go on last, thus the outline is the last to be dyed.

This is the finished swallow piece.

Again I used very little beeswax but after the first two dips..this means, the lighter colours white, yellow, light pink, were preserved, but the colours used after bled.

I wanted to highlight the potential of batik techniques, and show how different it is from painting. If a medium is explored to its possibilities, then how does it differ? Those that just paint on and wax successive layers, are not illustrating their understanding of the medium.

I am doing a second looser design of this piece too, its always advisable to work two pieces simultaneously.  I will alter the techniques used to see which I prefer.

Batik Handout

Click on …      batik handout  .. to download a handout for help planning your Batik.

…here’s some of the important stuff..

some colour combinations using purely the dipping method

White – yellow – orange – red/orange – brown or purple – black

White – light blue – dark blue – purple/brown – black

White – peach- pink – grey – black

White – yellow – green – turquoise – purple/black

Some techniques

Crackling – cracking wax so colours bleed into the cracks

Permanent dyes – when applied on dry fabric, do not run

Half dips – dipping parts of fabric into different colours to achieve more colour variations

 (a simple and obvious half dip)

the fabric on the left is dipped in one colour.

the fabric on the right was dipped in this colour also but when removed was partly dipped in yellow(before waxing)

the colours blend and bled and is more typical for batik to “half dip” in this manner

 

Tie Dye – using elastic/string  to create a star burst pattern

Batik Classes

Batik Drop in classes coming up so I’m making a few visuals.

These are A4 size, and designed to teach the principles of batik but not over complicated in colour theory

1. Draw out design on 100% cotton fabric

lightly trace outline, no shading on your fabric.

cut fabric larger than design

pin to frame (i use cheap frames)

2. Wax everything you want to keep white.

the wax is the right temperature if it appears transparent on the fabric

if it doesn’t, then the wax is only sitting on the surface, and will not prevent the dye from penetrating the fabric.

3. Dip into lightest colour desired

rinse the fabric, (easier for the dye to penetrate)

dip into the dye bath,

I left it in for a few seconds to get the lightest shade.

(if you find the shade too dark, rinse it under a cold tap)

4. Fully Dry fabric

using a hair dryer dry the fabric..not too much heat or the wax will remelt and spread

picture shows it on a radiator(not advisable)

NB>

picture 4 shows how two different pieces where dipped into the same bath but different tones were achieved.

The piece on the right was half dipped into yellow after the pink.

1. Wax and Dip

this image shows the white areas(which were waxed)

and the first dipping stage.

this piece was dipped into yellow and pink..the colours bled in different areas

This is nice for sky, or for achieving quicker, more varying results.

2.Second Wax

Once the piece was completely dry (wax and water don’t mix)

I waxed the the areas I want to keep these colours, including a few areas originally waxed which had some cracks

(more on crackling later)

Now its time for tea….

Follow me to find more on these.x

BATIK PINBOARD

I’ll be adding to this soon, but here’s the HOW TO on the first one

TO MAKE THIS 

YOU WILL NEED..

wax pot (insert)
 
(or double boil like chocolate but these pots will only be usefull for wax and EXTREME CAUTION is required)

hog hair (wax) and acrylic brushes (dye)

dyes (see how to make…https://ewesir.wordpress.com/tag/dye/ )

lots of newspaper / newsprint

iron

and all the materials for making a notice board in previous post https://ewesir.wordpress.com/2012/02/27/notice-board-easy-peesie/

ONE

TRACE IMAGE..you can see the drawing underneath in this image

CONSIDER WHERE YOUR LINES WOULD BE SO THEY CROSS OVER WHERE YOU WANT THEM

TWO

WAX EVERYTHING YOU WANT TO KEEP THE COLOUR OF THE FABRIC

CRACK THE WAX IF YOU WANT TO LEAVE DYE INTO THE CRACKS

THREE


I PAINTED IN THE DYE AS THERE IS SO LITTLE AREA TO BE DYED.

I BLED DIFFERENT DYES INTO THE PIECE.

I HAD USED NON-PERMANENT MARKER FOR THE OUTLINE WHICH BLED ALSO.

FOR THE CRACKS..I PAINTED THE DYE OVER THEM AND SCRUBBED INTO THEM WITH MY BRUSH

FOUR

sandwich the finished piece between newspaper

iron out until all the wax is gone..

keep changing the newspaper and use enough to protect your iron and board,

if the iron starts smoking..it’s because wax has transfered to the plate of the iron or it’s setting is releasing water.

FINALLY

staple all together as in earlier post.

PLACE RIBBON WHERE TELEPHONE WIRE WOULD BE.

Alternate Versions

excuse any bits and pieces sticking out..must add backing and secure tomorrow..

close up

“Lucy Homemaker”

8in embroidery round hoop

8inch embroidery hoop

“Converse”

“Blue Magpies”

6inch plastic embroidery hoop

FOUND A FANTASTIC TUTORIAL ON HOW TO MAKE THESE HOOPS SO HERE IS THE LINK

http://sunshineandcarousels.blogspot.com/2011/08/embroidery-hoop-pinboard-tutorial.html

Batik for complex individuals ;}

So I have decided to do a batik based on a complex image.
I want to explore the best ways of adapting an image for batik so I can show those not free hand drawing.
So as u hopefully can see, I enlarged a small picture to A3 black&white. I then used a green marker(the main colour in piece) to isolate this colour.
Like in painting- one fills in a ground /middle tone colour.

Next step trace it to fabric